Tender Brisket

Discussion in 'The Smokehouse' started by Woodsnwoods, Oct 14, 2019.

  1. Woodsnwoods

    Woodsnwoods

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    Can anyone on here tell me how to make my smoked brisket come out extremely tender? I have smoked several and the taste is absolutely amazing. The tenderness however is another story, its not jerky by any means but not tender. I had some in Nashville recently that had great taste, yet was like cutting butter. I cook mine with a dry rub, on the smoke for 2-3 hours. I then place in foil for about 7 hours, and cook for one last half hour open. I am screwing something up, I just do not know what that is..... Thanks
     
  2. bocefus78

    bocefus78

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    What internal temp are you taking it to?
     
  3. mrfancyplants

    mrfancyplants

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    What temperature are you targeting? It sounds like you have the “slow” down but is it “low”? My experience is with ribs and I try to keep my Webber between 175-225f, for 5 hours. I’m interested to hear about brisket.
     
  4. BHags

    BHags

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    I usually don't have the ten hours or so it takes to get a brisket tender. I'll break it up into two days, six hours on the grill, then a couple hours all wrapped up in the oven the next day.
     
  5. MikeInMa

    MikeInMa

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    Whole brisket? Flat? Point? Each have their own cooking time.

    Any chance of not slicing across the grain?
     
  6. Woodsnwoods

    Woodsnwoods

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    I normally get a 6 lb cut from Wegmans.....i did cut it against the grain. after some reading last night I found that I should let it rest in a cooler covered with towels....ten days from now I will give it another go....smoker smells nice in the fall!!
     
  7. Eric VW

    Eric VW Moderator

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    Absolutely!
    There is no other way.
     
  8. bocefus78

    bocefus78

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    Yep. Resting is very important. Let it sit for at least an hour. 2 being better imo.
     
  9. huskihl

    huskihl

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    I'd go with smoke for 6 or 8 hours, and then cover with foil and cook for another 12 hours. All at 200-250°
     
  10. SkidderDone

    SkidderDone

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    Super low and slow. Brisket properly done is like 12 hours at least at about 200ish. Brisket is not for the faint of heart.

    "Tender Brisket" = The best band name ever...
     
  11. BDF

    BDF

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    It seems that most people say that we should not go by temperature but I find that that works great for me. Cook the brisket with a thermometer in it until the internal temp. comes up to 195F at a minimum and continue to cook it for at least another 1 1/2 hours. The final internal temp. should be somewhere around 205 or maybe a little higher. It is the time and temperature (above at least 190 F) that breaks down the connective tissue and makes the meat tender.

    I just did two pork butts this way and they were fantastic- still had some texture but absolutely no toughness. Cooked to an internal temp of 205F on one, 209F on the other.

    Of course you can use a thin piece of metal or something like a bamboo skewer to probe the meat (Easy Boys!) but honestly, going by temperature works well for me. Of course I have not been smoking meat for long and I am certainly not an expert but again, this works for me (cooking by internal temp.).

    I also find that breaking the point off the flat and cutting out all excessive fat works for me too and that is probably a pretty serious crime in places like TX so take my opinion for what it is worth..... :D

    Brian

     
  12. The Wood Wolverine

    The Wood Wolverine

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    While on smoke, I watch the temp for the stall, then wrap in foil. Watch the temp for your final target (not going to debate that one), then let it rest in that foil for a couple hours.
     
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  13. BHags

    BHags

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    I never use thermometers. Not knocking them, but part of grilling and smoking for me is the challenge of knowing when the meat is done just by seeing and smelling. That may sound foolish and risky, but I bet it works for me 90% of the time. The fun is in the hanging out, having a few cold ones and enjoying the day. Electronic probes, phone apps, and all the other gadgets take the fun out of it for me.
     
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  14. eatonpcat

    eatonpcat

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    Then the 10% of the time you guess wrong, drink more cold ones and the raw tough brisket will still taste great! :drunk::coldone::grizz::cheers:
     
  15. BDF

    BDF

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    Hey, no problem with that from me, especially if that is how you like to do it. And surely I am in the minority, it seems that the great majority go by time and temp. of the smoker, and the only testing is done with a skewer to test real tenderness. I have tried it that way too and while it works great, I was not thrilled with trying to probe a large piece of meat (there is a joke in there for sure) wrapped in foil two times.

    I have only been using a smoker for just over a year so of course my experience is pretty limited. But I find just checking meat temp. to work very well for me in getting the meat cooked at least reasonably correct; my much bigger problems are rubs, smoking temps., getting a good and deep bark and what kind of wood to use. And the pesky fact that most locally available meats used for smoking have been brined so that really throws the rub off, or at least that is how it seems. All of that said, I smoke quite often and have been able to eat everything that came out of the smoker..... so far. Some batches are better than others though and that is what I find to be my biggest problem- consistency. But I am really enjoying the experience and it is actually a pretty inexpensive hobby, really. Mostly very rough, tough cuts of meat are used and so they are cheap, and the smoker fixes those particular cuts big problem- edibility.

    In fact, just made up a new rub last night and will be smoking a pork butt and a rack of ribs (St. Louis, pork ribs) with it in the next two days. Also going to try cherry for fuel, violating the first rule of learning how to do anything: only make one change at a time. :picard::D

    Brian

     
  16. FatBoy85

    FatBoy85

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    I didn’t make a brisket but I had spatchcock chicken and then made a slather mix of butter, apple juice, apple vinegar, seasonings and some bourbon. I cooked it down just a bit before getting it on the chicken and boy that chicken was juicy. Since you’re bbqing for a longer period, you could slather more heavily if you want then check less often. I covered the chicken in foil too. Keep the heat indirect as possible.
     
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  17. woody5506

    woody5506

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    I usually get stuff from Wegmans too out of convenience HOWEVER i do think their brisket is not that great. Typically they are small cuts, fairly lean and definitely over priced. Try a local meat market if you have one nearby. Last time I did a brisket, it was about a 5lber from Wegmans that I just kept on all day (I wanna say about 9 or 10 hours) as close to 225 as possible. I only wrapped in foil for the last hour, and I think it was unnecessary. I had a fear of it drying out though. This brisket came out tender although not totally fall apart butter tender, but I think by BBQ standards it was pretty good. The flat was borderline dry although my guests loved it. So my advice would be to keep it slow and low and try skipping the foil, I don't think it's necessary.
     
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  18. BHags

    BHags

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    Screw the big corps! Shop small!
     
  19. Woodsnwoods

    Woodsnwoods

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    Another upstater?
     
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  20. webby3650

    webby3650

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    I’ve never heard of a professional or a serious bbq enthusiast not use temps rather than time or the feel of the meat. All the pros talk temp, not time. It works every time! I get tender brisket routinely if I follow the advice above. 200+ internal, rest in a cooler for a few hours is key. Your doing it right!