Taking the plunge

Discussion in 'The Sawyer Room' started by Road-side Oak, Sep 10, 2021.

  1. Road-side Oak

    Road-side Oak

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    Hey everybody, another newbie to milling here. My folks had a nearly dead chestnut oak (I think) tree taken down today. I scored four 8ft logs, nice and straight, 28” diameter. Finally I have some logs in a spot where I will have some time to get at them! Anyway, I placed an order for a 36” granberg mill , a new 32 “bar (to complement my 20” and my 28”) and some ripping chain. I’m wondering if I should have gone with the 30” mill as I only have a 462 to cut with at the moment. I realize its a bit undersized for this task but I’m just planning to take it slow and keep my chain as sharp as possible.
    While I wait for the mill I’m trying to plan for simple rack/foundation for stacking the slabs… any simple suggestions for that? Also any recommendations for good sticker if material? 1ADCE6B3-86C8-4FD8-969E-3AB56E77A751.jpeg E93E3230-3AA1-4C5F-87F2-DE816A85E37F.jpeg 7AADF3ED-2122-4F9C-BA32-30F17AEFE44F.jpeg 13302C90-5E03-4F16-AC37-E454B44A0FB4.jpeg
     
  2. JB Sawman

    JB Sawman

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    any support for your slabs should be no more than 2 ft apart the first slab should be at least 8-10 inches off the ground ,your stickers should line up with your bottom supports a lot of times everybody uses stickers made of the same wood as you are stacking less chance of sticker stain but any wood can be used as long as it is dry I mostly use poplar stickers . On the subject of stickers on larger slabs I use 2 x2 stickers to allow for more airflow . Chainsaw milling is tough on your saw run your mix at 25:1 Good luck JB
     
  3. Road-side Oak

    Road-side Oak

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    Thanks for the advice JB. I don’t have access to any dry hardwood sticker material. I suppose I could buy a few poplar boards and rip them down but it would be a pretty expensive way to go and they would prob need to be doubled up for thickness. Can I sacrifice an oak slab to make stickers for this project or would the green wood stickers cause staining?
     
  4. JB Sawman

    JB Sawman

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    I have always ended up using green wood for stickers you get some stain in the summer with high heat and humid weather but cool weather seem to slow it down if you have a lumber store near you sometimes they have culled 1x4 and2x4 cheap that you could rip for stickers but you have to get there before the good lumber buyers for Lowes or Home Despot get there because what good lumber stores will throw out they will sell as premium lumber :D I have also used 1x2 furring strips for stickers Hope this helps you out JB
     
  5. buZZsaw BRAD

    buZZsaw BRAD

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    Some primo logs for milling. I love the smell of fresh cut chestnut oak. Cant wait to see the boards they make.

    I never really saw the value of logs for milling until buzz-saw got his band saw mill. Now i want to mill everything!
     
  6. Husky Man

    Husky Man

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    If you want double live edge slabs from the center of the logs, a 30” mill wouldn’t have done it on a 28” log, and your 32” bar may not be enough either.

    My 36” Granberg mill measures 33.5 “ between the inside faces of the bar clamps. The “Listed Size” of a CSM is the length of the frame rails, NOT, it’s Capacity. You also need 4-6” more bar length than the mill’s listed size, to get the full capacity of the mill. You might be close with your 32” bar, if you remove the Dawgs from your saw. Remember the nose sprocket and it’s bearings, when you clamp the nose end of your bar, don’t crush them.

    If you’re wanting dimensional lumber, or single live edge, a Granberg G555B edging mill, would be an excellent companion tool for your CSM.

    Stay SAFE, and have Fun, don’t forget the pics of your results, both as Lumber and Finished Projects


    Doug :cheers:
     
  7. The Wood Wolverine

    The Wood Wolverine

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    Milling is tough work. Those are some decent size logs for that saw. A good tip I can give is, after a long wide open cut, leave the saw sit at idle for a few minutes so the flywheel can cool things off. If you just shut it down right away the heat doesn’t dissipate as quick (can really soak those seals w heat). Try to prevent running out of gas too. I’ve milled at 40/1 with good oil for quite a bit with great success. I’ve heard some of the newer auto-tuning saws don’t like really oil rich mix ratios.


    Can’t wait to see the pics when you are done. :yes:
     
  8. Joe P

    Joe P

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    Wow, I'd like to throw that Oak up on my mill. Gorgeous!! I'm running my ported 572 on a 24:1 mix and haven't really noticed a big difference in performance. I may try a 32:1, but won't go any leaner than that