Making Charcoal on purpose

Discussion in 'The Smokehouse' started by mywaynow, Mar 8, 2021.

  1. mywaynow

    mywaynow

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    Using the NC30 to make charcoal for the Kamado Joe. Small holes in the side near the top for breathing and removed the rubber gasket. Seemed viable on paper and works great in reality. Here she is in action. Flames blowing out as the Walnut gasses out. Since friday I have filled a 15 gallon tub. 20210308_065835.jpeg
     
  2. woody5506

    woody5506

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    Been wanting to make my own too. On one hand I like trying different brands of lump charcoal since I still haven't found a go-to favorite. On the other hand, the last bag I bought was something like $20 which to me is expensive for charcoal when I have 3 years worth of seasoned hardwood at home I didn't pay a dime for.
     
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  3. Jon_E

    Jon_E

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    If I want charcoal I fill my outdoor wood boiler up with good wood - oak, cherry or apple - and wait until I get a hard burn cycle. Then I go in just before the next cycle starts, shovel out whatever coals I can find, screen them into a metal bucket and I have enough charcoal for several nights worth of barbecue. I try not to mix any junk in there, don't want pine, poplar or anything that would taste funky off the grill. I find maple to be particularly obnoxious, flavor-wise.

    I've always liked Mali charcoal for bagged stuff, although I've been really happy with Cowboy lump lately, it's got good sized pieces and burns hot.
     
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  4. Scotty Overkill

    Scotty Overkill Administrator

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    How the hell have you been, mywaynow?

    I'd like to make a double barrel stove to make my own charcoal, just no time to get into the task. I'd use wood chips from our tree jobs to fire it, and cut up blocks of oak for the actual charcoal....
     
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  5. mywaynow

    mywaynow

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    I am too frugal to buy charcoal when it is very easy to make. Perfect time to do in the shoulder season that is upon my area. Ammo box uses up about 1/4 of the firebox. I am working on getting another which would be real nice as it will provide a nice small pocket for the wood. Filled a second tub with all Walnut. Working on converting a Plum tree that was in need of being gone near my house. The smell in the basement where the stove is exactly what you smell when you go to a great wood-fired Italian restaurant.
     
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  6. woody5506

    woody5506

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    Tried it out last week, I had one batch come out good and the other a bit over done where it all sorta just fell apart upon handling. All red oak. I'll be experimenting more, starting to throw the good BBQ hardwood uglies into their own "charcoal/smoker pile" now.

    The conundrum is the amount of wood required to heat the bucket I made this in. I basically built the fire around a metal paint bucket with lid and vents in the lid. Once it stopped smoking I just covered the vent holes. Maybe it makes more sense to just start the fire inside the bucket and snuff it out from there rather than heating the outside of the bucket? I know it can be done either way, I guess mine is more based on the pyrolosis effect...?

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