Kawasaki mule went in the pond. What would you do ?

Discussion in 'Chainsaws and Power Equipment' started by J bird, Jun 30, 2020.

  1. J bird

    J bird

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    First off I did not take pictures because I want it to not have happened. My kids where down at the pond fishing and long story short the mule ended up in the pond. It was not running and the kids called me so I went down with the tractor and yanked it out. It was totally under water. Maybe spent 30 minutes in the drink. That was 1:30 am Sunday night/Monday morning, I had to be up at 3 so I pushed it in the barn till Monday afternoon. New gas ,new motor oil , new oil filter ( will run a few hours and change again) dried out the cylinders, Marvin’s mystery oil everywhere , new battery , and it cranks and runs. I did have to take the cover off the drive belt so it would dry but it did and seams to run alright. My question is what else should I do to head off any problems that I can. You guys and gals are the best on the web so I know you will have some great suggestions. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. MikeInMa

    MikeInMa

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  3. brenndatomu

    brenndatomu

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    Make sure the air cleaner box is completely drained too...they often have a plug or cap that can be pulled to drain them.
    I would drain the oil out of the differential(s) too.
    Other than that, maybe see if the lights look like they have water in them.
    That's about it...you will find out over the next year if it got in anywhere else, like the starter motor, brake housings (disc or drum brakes?) etc...it shouldn't have, but they are not designed to be submarined either...the stuff that goes under during creek crossings is either sealed well (when new) or designed to drain.
     
  4. JWinIndiana

    JWinIndiana

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    My dad ran a wrecker service with his gas station for over 20 years. When ever a customer submerged a vehicle We would drain the engine oil, transmission oil, rear differential, spark plugs. Spark plugs out and turn over engine to remove any water on top of the pistons. Then engine oil drained along with transmission fluid and replaced. Rear differential drained and refilled. If four wheel drive front differential drained and refilled. Pop the top on the master cylinder and check for water and if found drain and refill the brake system. A fan with both front doors open, fan blowing through the cab drying out under the dash. Pull and repack wheel bearings and that is all I remember. It is a job, but being submerged is completely different than getting wet on the road.
     
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  5. bushpilot

    bushpilot

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    God job, and good advice here! I would add to spray a little WD 40 in every hinge point that isn't usually lubricated, to displace any moisture there.

    And then be attentive for new squeaks and dry/bad sounding bearings in the future.

    I think you will find little harm done in the long term. A submerged car is another thing altogether.
     
  6. bigfrank

    bigfrank

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    I agree. change ALL fluids and ALL filters. If you have it running already, you had gotten all the water out of the cylinder(s). You then should be good to go.
     
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  7. SKEETER McCLUSKEY

    SKEETER McCLUSKEY

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    Does it have a hydraulic dump?
     
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  8. Horkn

    Horkn

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    Yeah, you should be good, just double check the airbox to ensure its dry.

    The fact that it wasn't running when it went in should put your mind at ease.
     
  9. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage

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    I would also change the oil and filter after running maybe 10-15 hours and be liberal with WD-40.
     
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  10. Horkn

    Horkn

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    He mentioned that he'll change the oil and oil filter again after a few hours of running. :yes:


    Use of WD-40 is a key thing though. I'm not a big fan of it for actual lubrication, but it's water displacing capability is huge. For this instance it's a huge benefit.
     
  11. OldJack

    OldJack

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    Neighbour's boy drowned a Dodge with a 318 back in 1974. Drained 3 25 lb. grease pails of water before it stopped running out. Pulled the spark plugs and water sprayed out of all 8 holes. Filled her up with oil, ran her for a minute and pulled the dipstick. Very milky oil, cleared up on the third change.
     
  12. J bird

    J bird

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    No it doesn’t.
     
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