Fischer or Grizzly

Discussion in 'Non-EPA Woodstoves and Fireplaces' started by Hoytman, Jul 3, 2019.

  1. Hoytman

    Hoytman

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    Would like to find one or a couple of these, or one of each, to do some modifications to. Would need one sized for 1300 sq. ft. and would prefer one that would have glass doors or be modified to have glass doors.

    Would prefer good condition on the outside, no heavy rust/pitting. Prefer top vent, but may consider rear vent if stove is in good enough condition.

    Not really looking at the moment, just brought it up for conversation. Thinking about a hybrid modification with glass doors and the ability to completely shut down the air supply, unlike any modern built stove, which to me is a real safety hazard. You shut the air supply off in an over-fire situation, which can't be done on modern stoves that I'm aware of, and you can shut down a potentially bad situation. As far as I know, that can't be done with a modern over-firing stove.

    I'd like to be able to choke one just like I can with my old stove...can cool it down in a hurry in case of emergency or if I need to leave the house in an emergency.

    I know Fischers were built very well. Don't know too much about Grizzly...although they look built comparably well.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2019
  2. Eric VW

    Eric VW Moderator

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    WeldrDave

    And to speak to this....
    ... Backwoods Savage
     
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  3. papadave

    papadave

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    Never had an overfire in the 30 in the 5.5 years I've had it. Not sure where that idea came from, but it's not much concern. Learn to run the stove, and it'll be fine.
    It may burn hotter than you'd like or need at times, but that's not an overfire.
     
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  4. brenndatomu

    brenndatomu

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    The only way a modern stove is gonna run away is if the draft is too high, control the draft, control the stove...put in a manual damper to be used in an "emergency situation"...problem solved...:handshake:
     
  5. WeldrDave

    WeldrDave Military Outpost Moderator

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    I gotta chime in with Papadave here, I've never had a run away fire, or at least one I couldn't bring down quick. The Fishers have the front draft/control knobs and I've had my pipe temp hit 650º once or twice but once I close them down to barely opened, the temps come right down. Fisher made a couple models with a glass front doors, some had "slides" for air and I believe the new models had the knobs on the sides. "I may have that mixed up". Either way another stove that was a good stove with a glass door was a Kodiak, made by Alaska stove works. Once you get a Fisher figured out, they will almost run itself. Once I light my stove, I open the draft knobs about 1/2 turn till the pipe temp hits right about 400º then back it down to a 1/4 turn and leave it be! The stove will stay at 450º surface temp all day, once I see the temp go down to 300º I know it's time for a big split or two. :) For as far a size is concerned, a Grandma fireplace edition would be just fine but you wouldn't even need one that big. It is however one of the stoves with glass unless you could get lucky and "find" a Honey bear, they were made for mobil homes and don't quote me but I "think" some of them had glass doors also.
     
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  6. WeldrDave

    WeldrDave Military Outpost Moderator

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  7. Hoytman

    Hoytman

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    Wasn't even thinking about the NC 30 when I posted this thread as it's something I've had planned to do for quite a while now, but I certainly appreciate the information being I am considering buying an NC30. Gives me a little peace of mind.

    Though I had not intended to mention it, I suppose in the back of my mind I was thinking more of the over-fire issues I've read about on some QF and PE stoves and especially VC Flexburn. As I've said before elsewhere on this forum, the typical operating range of these (most all brands) stoves are so close to the over-fire rates, too close in my opinion, that it doesn't leave much room for error for the owner/operator. With warranted stoves, this can be the difference in a boat anchor and a replacement stove.

    There "is" at least one documented case (youtube) of a VC Flexburn out of control for no apparent reason. This wasn't from someone wanting to bad mouth that company, rather it was from a life long customer who owned several VC stoves, bought the new one...had issues with the stove and major customer service issues.



    This thread wasn't intended to be about over-firing, though I guess it's related, it was more the idea of a tinkering project for my son and I. Here's what I have in mind...except with more modifications...



    I figure this could be done with either a Grizzly or a Fischer stove...any stove really, but I like the looks of the Grizzly and Fischers. Either would be sweet with glass doors. The main purpose of this is to give "me" more control over what I want out of my stove rather than some agency.

    I want to be able to burn it like an old stove, have the looks of an old stove, while having some "hot rod mods". LOL!!
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2019
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  8. Hoytman

    Hoytman

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    Hey there Dave! Thanks for chiming in.

    If I bought a Fischer, not sure which one would fit my 1300 sq.ft. home, I don't think I could modify it...unless...it was in poor shape to begin with. I'd rather buy a nice one and leave it that way.

    I've seen one with glass windows with side knobs, one with glass windows with slides on the front. I believer I'd prefer the slides, but I'd say you can get a finer adjustment with the knobs...though I hate the spin knobs on my current stove. Too hard to remember which has how many turns or not. A slide seems much easier.

    Never seen the Kodiak, I don't think.

    Might keep me in mind if you see a nice Fischer top vent somewhere for sale. My house sale is almost finalized and it'll be "game on" time for some of these tinker projects.
     
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  9. Hoytman

    Hoytman

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    Holy Smokes!!! Great link, Dave! I like the top one best, then the bottom, then the single door. I'd like to find either of the two on the left. Wow!!!

    I absolutely would not modify any of those. Way too nice for that. I'll be looking for one of those. Very nice looking stoves.

    Didn't see any side twist draft knobs or any in the front on those models. Who cares though, still sweet stoves. Looks like the top one has a more modern single air lever. Wonder if it only controls primary air. Would like to see inside that one.
     
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  10. Hoytman

    Hoytman

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    I wonder if Fischer ever built any coal stoves?
     
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  11. papadave

    papadave

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    I've seen the vid of the secondary air mods.....VERY cool, and I thought I might give that a shot using our old Ashley.
    Still have the stove but never enough time.
    That guy has some skills.
    If you decide to give it a shot, the rule is "pics, or it didn't happen". :whistle::dex:
     
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  12. Hoytman

    Hoytman

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    If you read the reviews below the video the fabricator said he was getting 15 hour burns and 22 hours for a relight on hot coals. What I like about this set-up is "he" has FULL control via primary air knobs on side of stove, not just partial like on modern stoves, AND he has FULL control of secondary air going through the 3 secondary air tubes via a slide bar on the bottom front of the stove where a single lever adjusts the intake air amount of the 2ndary tubes. This is totally unlike how a modern stove is designed where it's likely that with a single lever everything is opened to what they consider the "optimal" level of intake air for both primary and secondary air. Optimal only in a controlled testing environment, that is. Likely not optimal in the real world, rather, "good enough".

    One plus of this fella's thought process, is that the primary air can be completely shut off. If he's using a damper, and I assume he is but I don't recall seeing it, then he can completely shut this stove down. (CORRECTION....he's not using a damper) I would imagine that closing the slide bar for 2ndary air would greatly reduce any air going to those air tubes, if any. I would assume that even if these were left open slightly that any 2ndary air that might infiltrate the firebox would likely ignite any smoldering smoke of the shut down process to the point it's too cool to burn it.

    Also, you will read where he wants to make some alterations adding 2ndary air tubes down the insides of the firebox below the baffle and down to the fire brick.

    Odd thing is, 2 videos and you never see him again aside from a few replies to some comments. He seemingly disappeared. Does anyone know him? Does he hang out here? Would be great to have a guy like that on the forum...um...I mean more like him. We already have several talented folks here.

    Like him, I'd like to do something similar just for a project to do. I don't think I could add anything that other "tinkerers" at stove companies haven't already thought of though. It would just be fun.
     
  13. bushpilot

    bushpilot

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    Back to the 30, it can easily be modified to allow full control. Anyone who has, that I know of, eventually goes back to the original configuration, because frankly they have it pretty well figured out at the factory.

    My stove shuts down without fail when I push the damper rod in. I have no fear whatsoever of an overfire.

    I once thought I would improve this stove, but it is about as good as you could want from a tube type stove for under $1000.

    (Sorry about the topic derailment ...)
     
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  14. WeldrDave

    WeldrDave Military Outpost Moderator

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    Yes they did, they made a model called just that, a "coal bear"!
    64556-e66f9d1e6ca71390125a5db938b23cd3.jpg
     
  15. shack

    shack

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    I love my late model Fisher Baby Bear...for me it's just right! I know it has at least 50 years more of service.
     
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