Once You Go Lumberjack

Leftovers of a creosote fire?

Discussion in 'Modern EPA Stoves and Fireplaces' started by FatBoy85, Aug 12, 2017.

  1. FatBoy85

    FatBoy85

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    IMG_2763.JPG IMG_2765.JPG I got on my roof today to get the moss off and took a better look at the top of the cap. Not sure what happened but if this is severe enough, let me know. Just a reminder there's nothing being connected to this chimney, but this concerns me as an integrity deal.
     
  2. Scotty Overkill

    Scotty Overkill Administrator

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    Looks like it's rusting out more than anything. When was the last time it was used?
     
  3. FatBoy85

    FatBoy85

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    I really couldn't say because when I moved in, the chimney was all walled up to begin with. But take notice to that melted part on the top?
     
  4. Scotty Overkill

    Scotty Overkill Administrator

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    Oh, ok...I see now. Didn't notice it the last time I looked, I thought I was looking at galvanized coated steel. Wow, that aluminum is melted pretty good, Id say at one time or another there was a flue fire.
     
  5. FatBoy85

    FatBoy85

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    Yeah I am glad that they sealed it up but this just takes the chimney to a new level that I don't even want to begin to use it and it will likely come down.
     
  6. Scotty Overkill

    Scotty Overkill Administrator

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    You could always install an insulted stainless liner, if you intend to use it that is what I'd do. But you'd want to put a camera down it first to look at the internal integrity.
     
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  7. FatBoy85

    FatBoy85

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    I don't really intend to use it at all at this point. Its considered a money pit if I can't really do much with it now. I had thought that a liner would be possible but I doubted the chimney guys were giving me a deal when i decided to ask for an estimate on both options when they really only gave me one.
     
  8. Scotty Overkill

    Scotty Overkill Administrator

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    In my opinion, for best efficiency you'd be better off with a class A chimney in the long run anyway.

    Cheaper and more efficient.
     
  9. Well Seasoned

    Well Seasoned Moderator

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    Stick a hand held mirror in there and check the clay tile (if there is clay tiles) if you had a chimney fire, the tiles could be cracked.

    All that galvenized stuff needs to go. If you have room, run an insulated liner down that thing. If no room, you'll probably have to break out that tile, then run the liner. Once the liner is in, pour a new crown.

    Or like mentioned, delete the chimney and run class A out.
     
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  10. BDF

    BDF

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    Looks like a chimney fire to me.

    Not really sure what you are asking but if I am following correctly, you do not intend to use the chimney, you are just concerned with its structural integrity..... or, will it fall off the house? If that is the question, the mortar and bricks look pretty good to me, and it depends on what is under it. If all the brick and mortar joints look like what is shown in the photo, and the flashing is intact and lying on the top of the shingles correctly, then I would say it should be fine regarding any weather or any other normal outside events.

    Even as a chimney, if the liner is good and that rusty cap replaced, it would probably serve for many more years. I would inspect it internally (Easy Boys! we are talking about the gentleman's chimney here!) carefully but as long as it is tile lined, all the tiles are there and there are no voids between the tiles, again, I would say it would be fine to use.

    For whatever that is worth.

    Brian

     
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  11. FatBoy85

    FatBoy85

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    I just don't intend to use it once I get my chimney up for the wood stove as two things happen. One is I lose space from the stove, and two I think that having one without a purpose just becomes defeated. You are correct as it looks intact but as I am concerned that the stone absorbs water and might be responsible for some of the moisture that I get in this house. The amount of brick in this is fair so I don't know what it looks like on the house level: where I walk. The attic looks sound but I have only been up there like twice since I've owned the house.


    Brian, I intend to go through the roof with my class A because as it is straight up. No frills and gimmicks. The chimney was told to me as a viable option but as I get listed items like double checking how the structure is, I am more than likely to take it down slowly. Why? The purpose has been served. Even though you may say "destroy a good thing?" It's the reasons behind such. I do appreciate your thoughts and support on the subject, they aren't lightly taken. You have a large project on your hands now as the house goes so consider it a very mutual decision that is thought from the consideration of others along with yours intact. I just don't plan to put this chimney into use as it may have more ramifications than benefits.
     
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  12. wildwest

    wildwest

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    My 2 cents,

    Hey FatBoy85 , no expert here but the house we recently moved into had 2 woodstoves both caked with creosote (moved in before we planned to, no furnace, wood stoves only so we had to use them). Turns out there was a creosote problem on both woodstoves here, the cat one was actually backflashing from the stove (worst was the door) when I opened the door to stoke it. Though we had it "professionally" cleaned, we ended up with many large chunks that were shiny like glass after cleaning the chimney ourselves. AND, after we took that stove out, the inside of the stove looked just like your pic of the creosote bark minus the rust. That "bark" was what was igniting and backflashing me. My previous use was on a pipe that we were militant on brushing (sweeping) but it was always only flyash since we always used dry wood..,.. this inherited and neglected chimney took chains to break the creosote out of so we could put an SS liner in. Better safe than sorry, looks dangerous to me either way. Clean the chimney (chains if needed) and line it, and scrape all the creososte bark off inside the stove.
     
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  13. wildwest

    wildwest

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    smoke dragon
     
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  14. BDF

    BDF

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    Yep, I understand perfectly- there are many consideration, and you have to balance them. But anyway, I was not suggesting or telling you that you 'should' use that chimney, merely saying that it did look usable (and I do not have enough information to say that overall, just going by the seven bricks in the photos :) ) should you choose to go that way. So nope, not trying to steer you toward or away from anything, just trying to answer what I thought was your question and going a bit further in that the chimney looks good enough to actually choose to do so.

    As an aside, I am a fan of insulated, SS, Class- A chimneys, for wood stoves anyway. A masonry chimney in excellent condition (like a new one) will stand up to a chimney fire better IMO but after that, all the benefits go to the round, SS chimney IME, starting off with the big one for me: round chimneys have NO CORNERS. The corners in a clay flue are horrible to clean. That alone really turns me against them. I have seen photos, though never one 'in the flesh', of round, cast- in liners in masonry chimneys and those may actually be excellent. But the usual clay flue lined, brick or cement block chimney is almost impossible to clean the corners so no matter how much time I have spent cleaning them, the question is always 'is that good enough' rather than the chimney is actually clean. All of this because in the end, one cannot have a chimney fire if there is no fuel (creosote) in the chimney.

    Anyway, that was what I was trying to convey: if concerned about the structure of the chimney, from what I can see it is strong enough to stay up there basically open- ended in time. It may even be usable, and I mean safely usable. But of course what to do with it is your choice and I have no opinion as I do not know about your house, the layout, how hard it would be to get to or install a new thimble and on and on. You are the one to make those decisions, of course.

    As always, the best of luck and success with the house and of course, the best comfort and safety regarding your heating this coming winter.

    Brian

     
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  15. FatBoy85

    FatBoy85

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    Oil furnace I believe. At least Ive been told by the neighbor who's been living in this area for the greater part of 40 years. There's no stove hooked up to this at all at this moment. Just has been drywalled up. But around my house in the backyard there's remnants of the hearth brick I believe it is. Im
    More likely to just take the cap down and get something to just top cover it and perhaps seal it a bit for the winter. Dunno if its coming down soon...
     
    Last edited: Aug 13, 2017
  16. Well Seasoned

    Well Seasoned Moderator

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    Oil furnaces vented into clay lined chimneys get eaten away very fast.
     
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  17. FatBoy85

    FatBoy85

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    Yeah likely this may not look all that great inside.
    Side note: neighbor next door has a fireplace I think of some kind. But the scary dang thing is their chimney. It comes out looking super crooked. I mean I look at it and its like an accident waiting to happen.... dunno if it was built same time frame as mine but it sticks out of the house and I just get a little bit of a laugh out of it how it looks wants to fall over.
     
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  18. Well Seasoned

    Well Seasoned Moderator

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    Yea, chimneys aren't as stable as most would think. Just a simple lean against one towards the top is enough to bring it down.
     
  19. FatBoy85

    FatBoy85

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    IMG_2792.JPG
    Tried putting this as you best see it with the straight base up against the house then the ....considerable lean. That's like off about 15°. If it was straight it would likely line up with the small threashold roof and the edge of the house roof.
     
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