Once You Go Lumberjack

First Pile/Season

Discussion in 'The Wood Pile' started by MJK Farm, Sep 11, 2017.

  1. MJK Farm

    MJK Farm

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    IMG_2731.JPG

    I am new to FHC and wood heating. I am working on my first pile and developing my wood lot. Here is my set up so far with wood for this winter in the back of the picture under the tarp and the small stack in the foreground is what will become my seasoning area for next year or the year after. It is mostly a tree that fell and took out power lines that I cut up and am splitting into pieces for seasoning. There were burn marks on the tree that took out the power line!

    I am using railroad ties I found on the back the property for the seasoning stack. The covered stack is sitting mostly on old pallets.
     
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  2. Canadian border VT

    Canadian border VT

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    looks great.. rail road ties are perfect for getting it up off the ground! Nice pics.. OK if a standard cord is 4 by 4 by 8 or 128 feet.. how many cords do you have dry for this winter.. hard to tell from pics but looks like you may be short for winter.. which depending on where in Maine can start in less than a month
     
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  3. MJK Farm

    MJK Farm

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    Canadian border VT, not the first time I have heard that :eek:.

    Under the tarp is 2 cord and the stuff I got off that tree that fell that is lying around to be split is maybe 1 (green). I am going to have to unfortunately purchase some seasoned this winter to get started as I don't have a backlog seasoned from previous years. I have a large oak down in the back I am going to work on this weekend, but that'll be for years in the future.

    Appreciate the input! :cool:
     
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  4. Canadian border VT

    Canadian border VT

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    do you have a new efficient wood stove or older one.. do you have a moisture meter? not trying to be negative.. first few years I burned my seasoned stuff was seasoned (cut split and stacked for a season or 2) but not dry.. I burned crazy amounts of wood got very little heat.. and :headbang:.. found FHC cause I was lookin for a new stove.. and learned most of the problem was me:eek: got 4 years out back stacked now..
     
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  5. Eric VW

    Eric VW

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    Well, we got a pic now!:thumbs:
    CBVT is spot on with the suggestions so far...a few will disagree on the MM, but if you can buy or scrounge soon, you'll be able to know where that moisture content level is quickly. You will need to resplit a piece of firewood in order to get the most accurate reading; once you have that new face exposed, push the pins in and presto! You'll know straight away what your dealing with.
    As you get further ahead in your stacks, you'll rely less and less on the meter, but they're useful for other tasks which may require understanding how "wet" something is, like subfloor, house items, etc....:yes:
     
  6. Warner

    Warner

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    Welcome! I haven't been here long but from what I have gathered burning wood correctly can be a tuff game to get into.
    I have been doing it the wrong way all my life. We will get the "seasoned" in the fall and burn it that winter. In an older stove it's not as much of a big deal as long as you keep a good eye on your exhaust ( like check weekly and expect to have to poke it out a couple times a year).
    I'm trying to be reformed and cut split and stack as much as I can before I buy my next stove. Which will be a modern more efficient one. Now I have a delima say to what size to cut my wood for the next stove. The current wood gobbler will take a 30 inch stick. The new stove will not ....
    Now I'm rambling about my wood habbit again. Anyho welcome again lots of knowledge and general support here!
     
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  7. Canadian border VT

    Canadian border VT

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    oh forgot to mention look up our resources tab drying times of wood.. you probably want to leave oak for a bare minimum of 2 years.. focus on the fast drying wood.. cherry.. popular. . soft maple etc it will dry fast and get you thru.. maybe if your close to another hoarder trade some wet for dry?
     
  8. Warner

    Warner

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    Oohhh. I didn't know wood tradeing was part of the club! Anybody near so nh wanna trade 5 cord of "seasoned"/wet wood for dry?


    Kidding...kinda:D
     
  9. MJK Farm

    MJK Farm

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    CBVT all great points and there is a lot to learn. I did order a moisture meter a few days ago online as some of my test burns have been smoky, hard to light, and they sizzle...sounds pretty wet. I purchased a wood stove from home depot to replace the old 1890 Franklin that was here when we bought this place. I can't remember the make and model off the top of my head but I'll do a review in the wood stove forum when it arrives. The key for me is getting that nice supply for years to come since we just moved in.
     
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  10. MJK Farm

    MJK Farm

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    Wow 30 inch stick that thing must be a beast!
     
  11. Warner

    Warner

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    I exaggerated a bit it will take 26 straight in if I kitty corner it will probably go for a 28. I never cut it that long it's too much for the wife to get in the stove. And heavy to process. 20 -22 is what I shoot for.
     
  12. bogydave

    bogydave

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    Welcome

    Well , you have a good start

    The most important thing for burning wood for heat
    (after a good stove & chimney installation)
    is good "DRY" wood .
    But" You burn what you got"
    , & learn as you go.

    Takes a few years to get set up with dry wood ready for the next burn season.

    A 3 year rotation plan has many advantages
    2 stacks of seasoning wood
    & one 2 + year old seasoned stack , ready to burn
     
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  13. papadave

    papadave

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    Can we get a pic? The only wood stoves HD sells (that I'm aware of) are the 13nc and the 30NC. With a pic, I can tell you pretty quick which one you have (as can several others here).
    Well, at least you're a quick study. :):yes: Lots of folks want to argue about that point, but as bogy said, "you burn what you got" until you can get ahead.
    I still get razzed about having 30 years worth stashed (not even close). Those same people still struggle with their fires, so I shrug it off with a chuckle.
    Took me almost 4 years to get dry wood ready.
     
  14. Eric VW

    Eric VW

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    30 years???!!!
    What plan is that, Scotty Overkill's?
    :rofl: :lol:
     
  15. HDRock

    HDRock

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    Welcome to da club MJK Farm
    Do you have some kind of backup heat or are you going to be heating 100% with wood ?
     
  16. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage

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    Welcome to the forum MJK.

    New to wood heating? This is great that you came onto the forum and many here can help. Canadian border VT already gave you some great suggestions. Please allow me to add a good resource for you and some very good reading: Primer on Woodburning by Backwoods Savage

    Railroad ties indeed will make a great base to stack on. If you need more, just cut some saplings in the woods and lay down to stack on. And remember, split the wood ASAP and stack where it will get plenty of air circulation. Top cover the wood too but never cover the sides or ends as it needs the air circulation to dry.

    The new stove will help a lot too. I fondly remember when we went from our old stove to the new stove and cut our wood needs in half and got the house a lot warmer too. Oh the joy! Not only that, but we went from cleaning the chimney multiple times every winter to now only occasionally cleaning it to get almost nothing out of it. We could go many years between cleaning now.

    One more word is on the amount of wood you have. You say 2 cord and one cord in that new pile. I very well might be wrong, and frequently am, but it appears to me you may be speaking of a face cord rather than a full cord. A face cord is a pile of wood that is 4' high and 8' long. But a full cord is also 4' deep, not a single row. If the wood is cut to 16" then you need 3 rows of 4' x 8' to make a cord. In Maine, I'd guess you would need a minimum of 5 cord per winter but that is only a guess.

    Also you mention getting some "seasoned" wood for this winter. Beware!!!! I shudder every time I see someone selling "seasoned" wood, because it usually is not. Read that Primer on wood burning and you will completely understand.

    Good luck to you.
     
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  17. Backwoods Savage

    Backwoods Savage

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    Warner if you plan on buying a new stove, I might suggest cutting the wood to 16". Rarely would one go wrong doing this.
     
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  18. Warner

    Warner

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    Thanks for the suggestion, my worry is that if life happens and I'm burning ole smoky for a few more years 16 inch wood will give me a much shorter burn time only filling the stove half way?
     
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  19. billb3

    billb3

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    much shorter burn time ?

    I suppose if you're inflexible you won't find ingenious ways to make shorter ones fit
    If you're really that incapable of learning anything new then a new stove is probably out too.

    may as well just self-institutionalize and wait out glorious death
     
  20. Warner

    Warner

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    Thanks bud
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2017